4 ways music improves our health

If you’re looking for an easy way to transform your mood, just listen to music. According to longlasting research, listening to music can heighten positive emotion through the reward centers of our brain, stimulating hits of dopamine that can make us feel good. In some cases, music’s impacts on health have been more powerful than medication. Here are four ways that music seems to impact our health.

Music reduces stress and anxiety

Music can prevent all biological markers of stress, the increasing of anxiety-induced in heart rate and systolic blood pressure, and the decreasing of cortisol levels. In one study involving surgery patients, listening to music had more powerful effects on stress-reducing than using an orally-administered anxiolytic drug.

In addition, one recent study has found that music helped to make in reducing anxiety and stress in a children’s hospital, above and beyond social contributions.

Music decreases pain

Although music has an impact on dopamine release, it’s not clear why music may reduce pain. Of course, stress and pain are closely linked; so music’s impact on stress reduction may also partly explain why music can decrease pain.

You can see that people use different kinds of music to promote specific types of healthy activities. One form of music might get you revved up to walk or run in the morning, then another type of music might be perfect to relax after that run. A good balance of physical activity and relaxation can help reduce the pain for people.

Music may improve immune functioning

Some researchers believe that listening to music can actually help prevent disease.

They found that levels of cortisol, the stress hormone, which can weaken the immune system, decreased significantly in those listening to the dance music, while their levels of the immune system’s first line of defense, the antibody immunoglobin A,  were heightened. So, listening to music can boost your immune system and may help fight off disease.

Music helps us exercise

The United Kingdom researchers recruited thirty participants to listen to motivational music, non-motivational music or no music while they walked until they reached exhaustion levels. Measurements showed that listening to music increased the length of time participants worked out. The participants who listened to motivational music felt better than those in the other two conditions.

In another study, results showed that when exercisers listened to music with a faster and synchronous beat, their bodies used up oxygen more efficiently than music with a slower and unsynchronized tempo.