Month: December 2019

What kind of music is played in casinos?

If you’ve ever ventured into a casino, you’ll realize that music is one of the biggest influences on visitors to these exciting venues.


Although some myths will suggest that casinos use music to keep people focused on the games they’re playing, enhance the player experience, by allowing them to enjoy. One of the many things that all types of music in the casino have in common is that they are particularly optimistic and interesting, to allow customers to have a good time as soon as they sit in their seats, instead of practicing. Focus on blackjack or poker legends are preventing them from enjoying the game. Many people are likely to spend more money if they listen to an upbeat song as opposed to a love ballad.

1

One of the most noticeable things about Las Vegas casino resorts is that they will often have a musician playing at the casino night after night. Whether it’s Calvin Harris or even Celine Dion, there are a large number of artists you can find there. However, that’s not the only thing they rely on when it comes to music in the casino, because without a bit of background music, the atmosphere of the casino floor would be really a bit dull.
In the Palm hotel, there was a lot of music chosen, and it turned out Palm’s CEO and president, Hotel Todd Greenberg, personally picked a lot of music from the playlist, along with a few trusted colleagues in order to provide guests with a large playlist to listen to instead of the same playlist of 20 songs played repeatedly.

During the daytime, during quieter times, some casinos can play lounge music, popular in the 1950s and 1960s. This is determined by its easy-listening quality and while in the daytime experience. The night may want to create a partying atmosphere in the casino through upbeat music, during the day, some people may want to have something more relaxing while they gamble, or cross the hotel to find the pool.

Music is a huge marketing tool in the casino. Music can really help change the attitude of guests, to bring the best atmosphere for guests. This enhances the guest experience, and as a result, they can stay longer and spend more money.

Today, with the online revolution, a lot of players moved to the online casinos where they can play their favourite games, Live casinos also peaked lately and in Ireland, they became very popular, when you play at one of the live casinos, you can also enjoy the music they play as they try to bring the full experience as if you were in a physical casino.

Ten Best Songs From A Star Is Born (part 2)

7. Too Far Gone

Gently sung by Cooper’s Jackson Maine, Too Far Gone is a beautiful metaphor for the major character’s constant struggle throughout the movie. Due to having been hooked on alcohol since a young age by his father, Jackson spent his rest life drinking himself with the pain of lacking his parents’ love.

In this song, Jackson is crying out about his own failings. Meanwhile, he is also explaining how his relationship with Ally has saved him.

6. Shallow

Shallow is the first song written by Ally to be shown in the movie. It is truly the heart of the film. When Jackson first invites Ally to attend at his concert, he surprises the aspiring star by inviting her to sing her very own song on stage.

Shallow becomes the signature song of the duo. Whenever they perform it together, we clearly feel how perfect they are for one another.

5. Always Remember Us This Way

Another song written by Ally, Always Remeber Us This Way was a clear metaphor for the two characters’ relationship. Created during what might have been the peak of their relationship, this song memorialized the moments that they had together.

Ally was afraid of performing the song for the first time on stage and Jackson convinced her by saying her “I love you” for the first time.

4. Look What I Found

Look What I Found, the very first song Ally recorded once signing her to her new record label, truly showed the new artist’s talent for songwriting. This single showed how talented Ally really is while she would go on to make more mainstream, less creative music.

Look What I Found is one of the last great examples of her wonderful talent, appearing just before Ally sells out for more mainstream popularity.

The best video game soundtracks of all time (part 1)

Video games and music have always had a tight connection. From classic Nintendo 8 to modern masterpieces like The Last Of Us and Red Dead Redemption, here’s our guide to the best ever video game soundtracks of all time.

1. Shovel Knight

Jake Kaufman

(PC/3DS, 2014)

Every good 8-bit game needs a good 8-bit soundtrack, and in putting together their NES-era homage Shovel Knight, developers Yacht Club Games knew they had to make sure there was as much attention paid to the sound as there was the rest of the game’s presentation. Thankfully videogame music nerd Jake Kaufman – who cut his teeth making music for the Game Boy Color in the early ‘00s – does a bang-up job of bringing to mind the golden era of chiptunes.

2. Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty

Harry Gregson-Williams and Norihiko Hibino

(PS2, 2001)

One of the only Playstation stealth soundtracks that don’t feel horribly dated (we see you hiding at the back, Syphon Filter), a.k.a. the start of your favorite Burial song.

3. Secret of Evermore

Jeremy Soule and Julian Soule

(SNES, 1995)

Secret of Evermore is the only game ever designed by Square in North America. Word upon release was that it was a Western spin-off of Secret of Mana when Square hadn’t ported the superior Seiken Densetsu 3 (Secret of Mana’s actual sequel) from Japan. That’s been denied by Square, but it didn’t save the game from receiving unfair backlash: Evermore is a flawed but good RPG with some genuinely unique elements, one of which is its soundtrack.

Nothing like other RPG OSTs of the time, it’s the first video game project of Jeremy Soule, who went on to become a titan of the genre, composing the Elder Scrolls series and more. Where the likes of Chrono Trigger and Final Fantasy favored strong, memorable melodies, Evermore’s OST combines long periods of ambiance (track titles include ‘Podunk, 1965’ and ‘Ambience – Jungle 2’) with spindly melodies that often feel like they’re held together by Elastoplast. Even some boss battles were simply drummed loops and pads. Unfairly maligned, but Soule’s approach to ‘90s RPG music was one of a kind.